Electric vehicles in KC charging up as a transportation option


With gas prices near record levels, simply driving across town is becoming a trickier prospect.So, KMBC is trying out some gas-free ways to get around Kansas City. The first test was getting behind the wheel of an electric car.”This is the 2021 Volkswagen ID.4. Her name Is Evie. We didn’t spend a ton of time on it.” Evergy senior manager Nick Voris said. Voris is the electric car guru at Evergy. He handed over the key to Evie for a day. The utility company is paying close attention to the increase in electric cars.”It is both an opportunity and a challenge. We as a utility company are responsible for making sure that our grid is ready for this evolution of the transportation sector as it electrifies, Voris said. After a quick tutorial, the electric Volkswagen took a trip around Kansas City, testing the regenerative braking system found in vehicles like it.”Take your foot off the gas, and it really pulls you back because it’s putting all that energy back into the battery ,” KMBC’s Matt Evans said. Then the battery was put to the test with a trip to Lawrence, Kansas, from Kansas City. The car has a full-charge range of about 275 miles.A quick drive around KU’s campus and down Mass Street had the battery about half-drained.The nearest charger was a level two from Evergy’s clean charge network. The charger added around 15 miles to the range every hour.On the way out of town, a quick stop was made at the level three DC fast charger in the service area on the Kansas turnpike. The level two charger would have taken three and a half hours to get back to a full charge, the level three just 20 minutes.It charges at a blistering speed of around 175 miles an hour.There’s only a handful of level three chargers in the Kansas City area, but the federal government hopes to add them every 50 miles on major interstates.”They’re going to be a very common thing five years from now,” Voris said. The prospect is significant for the outlook of getting even more electric vehicles on the road soon. You may be wondering about charging at home in a regular 120-volt outlet. It was very slow, only adding about two miles every hour. It would have taken more than 30 hours to get back to a full charge.If you’re wondering about the cost of making that initial investment. The Volkswagen ID.4 starts at around $40,000.

With gas prices near record levels, simply driving across town is becoming a trickier prospect.

So, KMBC is trying out some gas-free ways to get around Kansas City. The first test was getting behind the wheel of an electric car.

“This is the 2021 Volkswagen ID.4. Her name Is Evie. We didn’t spend a ton of time on it.” Evergy senior manager Nick Voris said.

Voris is the electric car guru at Evergy. He handed over the key to Evie for a day.

The utility company is paying close attention to the increase in electric cars.

“It is both an opportunity and a challenge. We as a utility company are responsible for making sure that our grid is ready for this evolution of the transportation sector as it electrifies,” Voris said.

After a quick tutorial, the electric Volkswagen took a trip around Kansas City, testing the regenerative braking system found in vehicles like it.

“Take your foot off the gas, and it really pulls you back because it’s putting all that energy back into the battery,” KMBC’s Matt Evans said.

Then the battery was put to the test with a trip to Lawrence, Kansas, from Kansas City. The car has a full-charge range of about 275 miles.

A quick drive around KU’s campus and down Mass Street had the battery about half-drained.

The nearest charger was a level two from Evergy’s clean charge network. The charger added around 15 miles to the range every hour.

On the way out of town, a quick stop was made at the level three DC fast charger in the service area on the Kansas turnpike. The level two charger would have taken three and a half hours to get back to a full charge, the level three just 20 minutes.

It charges at a blistering speed of around 175 miles an hour.

There’s only a handful of level three chargers in the Kansas City area, but the federal government hopes to add them every 50 miles on major interstates.

“They’re going to be a very common thing five years from now,” Voris said.

The prospect is significant for the outlook of getting even more electric vehicles on the road soon.

You may be wondering about charging at home in a regular 120-volt outlet. It was very slow, only adding about two miles every hour. It would have taken more than 30 hours to get back to a full charge.

If you’re wondering about the cost of making that initial investment. The Volkswagen ID.4 starts at around $40,000.

.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.