Utility offers suggestions to reduce demand on grid, cut bills


Utilities are seeing higher demand for water and energy to deal with the extreme heat.The city of Edmond said normal peak hours for energy and water are 2 to 7 pm But since the state has been in triple-digit heat, the peak time is broader And the demand is the highest it has been all summer. |MORE| OG&E customers see a drastic increase in prices amid heat wave”As an example, Edmond Electric saw 279-megawatt hours in demand in the first week of July. We normally don’t see that kind of demand until later in July or later into August, ” said Bill Begley with the city of Edmond. Edmond Electric purchases power wholesale. With higher demand, wholesale power has gotten more expensive. But there are ways customers can keep their bills down.”If you set your thermostat to 78, for every degree Below 78 degrees it takes 2 to 5 percent more power to cool your home, depending on how big the home is. control and cost on your bill,” Begley said.|MORE| Heat fails to dampen enthusiasm at Shawnee Youth RodeoYou can also keep demand down by making sure your air conditioner is clean and not overworking. Also, consider running utilities like your dishwasher in the early morni ng or late at night to reduce demand. “So we’re paying a little bit out of our reserves to make sure that those bills don’t really jump a lot, and we’re asking customers to use power and electrical devices and to be as smart as possible and do the things They can control,” Begley said.Water is another concern. Residents are being asked to conserve water.”Our biggest cost for water use is lawn maintenance,” Begley said.|MORE| Should Oklahomans be conserving water this time of year?Officials suggest knowing when your watering day is. The city isn’t expecting a change in services. But officials say it’s vital for everyone to be aware they are at peak demand as temperatures continue to rise. They don’t expect brownouts, but it’s important to conserve energy so it doesn’t reach that point.

Utilities are seeing higher demand for water and energy to deal with the extreme heat.

The city of Edmond said normal peak hours for energy and water are 2 to 7 pm But since the state has been in triple-digit heat, the peak time is broader and the demand is the highest it has been all summer.

|MORE| OG&E customers see a drastic increase in prices amid heat wave

“As an example, Edmond Electric saw 279-megawatt hours in demand in the first week of July. We normally don’t see that kind of demand until later in July or later into August,” said Bill Begley with the city of Edmond.

Edmond Electric purchases power wholesale. With higher demand, wholesale power has gotten more expensive. But there are ways customers can keep their bills down.

“If you set your thermostat to 78, for every degree below 78 degrees it takes 2 to 5 percent more power to cool your home, depending on how big the home is. That’s an easy thing for you to control if you’re trying to control your usage and the demand on delivery for Edmond Electric and control and cost on your bill,” Begley said.

|MORE| Heat fails to dampen enthusiasm at Shawnee Youth Rodeo

You can also keep demand down by making sure your air conditioner is clean and not overworking. Also, consider running utilities like your dishwasher in the early morning or late at night to reduce demand.

“So we’re paying a little bit out of our reserves to make sure that those bills don’t really jump a lot, and we’re asking customers to use power and electrical devices and to be as smart as possible and do the things they can control,” Begley said.

Water is another concern. Residents are being asked to conserve water.

“Our biggest cost for water use is lawn maintenance,” Begley said.

|MORE| Should Oklahomans be conserving water this time of year?

Officials suggest knowing when your watering day is.

The city isn’t expecting a change in services. But officials say it’s vital for everyone to be aware they are at peak demand as temperatures continue to rise. They don’t expect brownouts, but it’s important to conserve energy so it doesn’t reach that point.

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