Greensboro leaders react to ACC headquarters move


With the Atlantic Coast Conference leaving Greensboro, city leaders are reacting to the news. For almost 70 years since 1953, the ACC headquarters has stood in Greensboro off of Grandover Parkway. Mayor of Greensboro, Nancy Vaughn said this move isn’t surprising. “It’s disappointing but what’s important is that we were able to preserve the tournament play because that’s really quite frankly where we make our money and it’s also where we get the exposure,” Vaughn said. There were rumors of the headquarters being moved to Orlando, Florida.The ACC headquarters will move to Charlotte in 2023.”We’re certainly grateful that they’re staying in North Carolina. We would have preferred Greensboro but we’re happy that they’re in North Carolina.” Mayor Vaughn and Greensboro Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Brent Christensen say they don’t think the move will hurt sports tourism in the area. “We are a tournament town. We had 18,000 AAU athletes, we had the aquatic center full all the time, we have huge amateur youth athletes. We got soccer out of Ryan park, we got tennis, no absolutely not,” Vaughn said.”I think we are a community that’s really blossoming in terms of sports tourism. You’re seeing us compete for sports tourism events on a world stage these days,” Christensen said. The ACC cited a number of reasons for the move including access to the ACC member schools, population size, and more. Representative Jon Hardister who represents Greensboro sent a statement on the move.”As a lifelong resident of Guilford county, I regret that the ACC has chosen to relocate to Charlotte, but I am glad that they are staying in North Carolina. While this is not ideal for our community, there will still be many tournaments played in our area, and the ACC will continue to have a positive impact on Greensboro,” Hardister said in the statement.Representative Pricey Harrison who represents Guilford County also sent a statement on the move .“I grew up in Greensboro and have been attending ACC tournaments since I was a child. I worked with then State Senator Kay Hagan on legislation to establish the ACC Hall of Champions. While I am sad to see the ACC headquarters move, I am happy to know that it will remain in North Carolina, where four of the original seven charter universities are located. North Carolina is the rightful home of the ACC,” said Harrison in her statement. Economically, Christensen feels there won’t be a big impact from this move. “I think the ultimate loss is the office jobs that we will lose because of their relocation and I think that’s in the 50 range, but again we’ll keep the big money-making opportunities which are those ACC championships. “The money-making events for our community, those big championships that attract an awful lot of visitors to our community are sticking around,” Christensen said.

With the Atlantic Coast Conference leaving Greensboro, city leaders are reacting to the news.

For almost 70 years since 1953, the ACC headquarters has stood in Greensboro off of Grandover Parkway.

Mayor of Greensboro, Nancy Vaughn said this move isn’t surprising.

“It’s disappointing but what’s important is that we were able to preserve the tournament play because that’s really quite frankly where we make our money and it’s also where we get the exposure,” Vaughn said.

There were rumors of the headquarters being moved to Orlando, Florida.

The ACC headquarters will move to Charlotte in 2023.

“We’re certainly grateful that they’re staying in North Carolina. We would have preferred Greensboro but we’re happy that they’re in North Carolina.”

Mayor Vaughn and Greensboro Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Brent Christensen say they don’t think the move will hurt sports tourism in the area.

“We are a tournament town. We had 18,000 AAU athletes, we had the aquatic center full all the time, we have huge amateur youth athletes. We got soccer out of Ryan park, we got tennis, no absolutely not,” Vaughn said.

“I think we are a community that’s really blossoming in terms of sports tourism. You’re seeing us compete for sports tourism events on a world stage these days,”Christensen said.

The ACC cited a number of reasons for the move including access to the ACC member schools, population size, and more.

Representative Jon Hardister who represents Greensboro sent a statement on the move.

“As a lifelong resident of Guilford county, I regret that the ACC has chosen to relocate to Charlotte, but I am glad that they are staying in North Carolina. While this is not ideal for our community, there will still be many tournaments played in our area, and the ACC will continue to have a positive impact on Greensboro,” Hardister said in the statement.

Representative Pricey Harrison who represents Guilford County also sent a statement on the move.

“I grew up in Greensboro and have been attending ACC tournaments since I was a child. I worked with then State Senator Kay Hagan on legislation to establish the ACC Hall of Champions. While I am sad to see the ACC headquarters move, I am happy to know that it will remain in North Carolina, where four of the original seven charter universities are located. North Carolina is the rightful home of the ACC,” Harrison said in her statement.

Economically, Christensen feels there won’t be a big impact from this move.

“I think the ultimate loss is the office jobs that we will lose because of their relocation and I think that’s in the 50 range, but again we’ll keep the big money-making opportunities which are those ACC championships. We’ll continue to see that revenue, we’ll continue to have those events,” Christensen said.

“The money-making events for our community, those big championships that attract an awful lot of visitors to our community are sticking around,” Christensen said.

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